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Posts tagged ‘Robert E. Lee’

Ann Coulter Op-ed: Gray Lives Matter


Commentary by Ann Coulter | Posted: Sep 15, 2021

Read more at https://townhall.com/columnists/anncoulter/2021/09/15/gray-lives-matter—p–n2595963/

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.

Gray Lives Matter

Source: AP Photo/Steve Helber

My ancestors were Presbyterian abolitionists who fought on the Union side, but I get really ticked off when imbeciles take a sledgehammer to my country’s history.

Last week, with self-satisfied glee, savages tore down the 14-foot statue of Robert E. Lee designed by the French sculptor Antonin Mercie and installed in 1890 on land deeded to the state — in return for a promise that the Commonwealth of Virginia “will hold said Statue and pedestal and Circle of ground perpetually sacred to the Monumental purpose to which they have been devoted and that she will faithfully guard it and affectionately protect it.”

But Virginia’s supreme court ruled that the state had a “free speech” right to violate the deed. On that theory, no contract can ever be enforced. I have a free speech right to say that I will NOT deliver 20 pounds of bananas!

It’s not just “Southerners” who revere Lee, as his Wikipedia page implies. Franklin Delano Roosevelt called Lee “one of our greatest American Christians and one of our greatest American gentlemen.” Dwight Eisenhower said Lee was “noble as a leader and as a man, and unsullied as I read the pages of our history.” Even Ulysses S. Grant called him “the acknowledged ablest general in the Confederate army.”

The son — not grandson — of a hero of the American Revolution, Lee graduated second in his class at West Point, then distinguished himself in the Mexican-American War. Lee’s reputation was so great that President Lincoln asked him to take command of the Union forces against the South. But Lee was a Virginian and felt compelled to take Virginia’s side, so he resigned from the U.S. Army.

(For my illiterate readers and anyone who gets his news from MSNBC: That makes Lee the opposite of a “traitor.” A traitor is someone who pretends to be on your side, while secretly working with the enemy, not someone who loudly announces, I quit. My friends and I are leaving.)

Among his accomplishments, there’s also the minor fact that Lee saved the country. Immediately after a bitter, bloody civil war, pitting brother against brother — four of Mary Lincoln’s five brothers fought for the Confederacy — the landscape littered with the dead, Lee ensured that the South would accept defeat.

When Lee surrendered at Appomattox, he was at the height of his powers, idolized throughout the South. The president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, wanted to fight on, telling his officers, “I think we can whip the enemy yet, if our people will turn out.”

But Lee, not Davis, held the hearts of his countrymen. When one of Lee’s own officers urged him to lead a guerilla war against the North, Lee remonstrated, “as a Christian people, there is now but one course to pursue. We must accept the situation; these men must go home and plant a crop, and we must proceed to build up our country on a new basis.”

He could easily have pulled a Trump and told his supporters, We got screwed! Take to the hills! They would have followed. Hundreds of thousands more lives would have been lost. The country might never have recovered.

But Lee said no, it ends now.

In his biography of Grant, Ron Chernow says the Union general believed that “had Lee resisted surrender and encouraged his army to wage guerrilla warfare, it would have spawned infinite trouble. … Such was Lee’s unrivaled stature that his acceptance of defeat reconciled many diehard rebels to follow his example.”

Thanks to Lee, we became a functioning country again within about 15 years, instead of becoming Serbia, Afghanistan, Korea, Vietnam, Rwanda and on and on and on.

After Lee’s surrender, Union soldiers saluted their defeated foes. Erstwhile warring officers embraced one another. One Confederate officer said: “Great God, thought I to myself, how my heart swells out to such a magnanimous touch of humanity! Why do men fight who were born to be brothers?” When told of Lee’s surrender, Lincoln ordered the Union band to play “Dixie.” Years later, Grant spoke of his deep affection for Lee’s army, second only to that for his own men.

Never has a civil war ended with such love between the former enemies. That’s our history, our country, our war — North and South, black and white.

The vandalizing of American history has absolutely nothing to do with black people or slavery. Lots of historical figures had slaves. Not only American heroes like Washington and Jefferson, but Kamala Harris’ ancestors — according to her own father. Barack Obama is the only president who might be descended from slave traders, a particularly repellent group, inasmuch as Kenya was a major player in the slave trade.

How about these white saviors demand a box on their Ivy League admission forms: “If admitted to Harvard, would you be willing to give up your place to a black person?” That will NEVER happen. Instead, we get: I went out and courageously defaced a Confederate statue! Because some things are more important than my personal comfort.

No, the moving force behind this frenzied destruction of American history isn’t black people suddenly offended by monuments that have been around for a century; it’s pushy newcomers, bitter that their ancestors had nothing to do with the creation of this country. After other people’s ancestors carved a nation out of the wilderness, they just kind of showed up. Now they go around obliterating anything that reminds them that this country was up and running long before they got here.

America’s leading hate group, the Southern Poverty Law Center, titles its report on Confederate symbols “Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy.” Yes, exactly, it’s not their heritage, so it must be destroyed. My ancestors fought on the Union side, but they were involved, and it matters to me.

MSNBC’s smirking Chris Hayes can get weepy about some ancient Roman ruin, and Rachel Maddow about a building in Warsaw, but I care about my history. These savages are smashing and graffitiing my antiquities.

How would they like it if we took a sledgehammer to “Piss Christ”?

CONFEDERATE BATTLE FLAG GONE. NEXT STATUES. THEN RENAME HIGHWAYS, SCHOOLS.


waving flagBy John Gibson, Jun 23, 2015

Commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg

Liberals’ Intollerance of History Sets Off Massive Purge. The Confederate Battle Flag is toast. Burnt toast.

South Carolina’s Governor and both U.S. Senators (one black, one white) have called for its removal from the capitol grounds. The legislature will take up the issue and will promptly vote to remove the flag.

The lonely voices of resistance to the purging of the Confederate flag will soon be silenced. It is simply not cool to display the Confederate Battle Flag.

Wait…correction. It is forbidden.

Just to be clear, I’ve never owned or displayed any item of confederate flag-ware. Don’t particularly support its display. But geez…I don’t cause of deaththink I’ve ever seen a stampede to political correctness quite like this one. Any moment I expect Jimmy Carter to issue a tearful apology for using the Stars and Bars to carry the South.

But after the flag has been rendered non existent if you thought that was going to be the end of it, silly you.

In New Orleans, the mayor is thinking maybe that statue of Robert E. Lee in Lee Circle has to go. Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s office  is looking forward to New Orlean’s 300th birthday. His office issued a statement that the city “should include a close examination of the historical symbols throughout our city and what changes could be made as we approach 2018, including the Robert E. Lee statute in Lee Circle.”

The statement went on, in expand the scope of the purge: “These symbols say who we were in a particular time, but times change. Yet these symbols – statues, monuments, street names, and more – still influence who we are and how we are perceived by the world.  Mayor Landrieu believes it is time to look at the symbols in this city to see if they still have relevance to our future.”Liberalism a mental disorder 2

That’s a hint of what is to come. Jefferson Davis Highway? New name coming. Statue of the President of the Confederacy? Soon to be gone. In fact, the Atlantic Magazine is ginning up the next round of expunging the Confederacy from the pages of history, at least that part of history in public view. It is a looooonnnng list. “The database of the National Center for Education Statistics shows at least 20 schools named for Robert E. Lee, and nine apiece for Stonewall Jackson and Jefferson Davis,” the magazine says, clearly urging changes and quick.

In Tennessee there’s a bust of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest in the state capitol. Gotta get rid of that. Same in Texas where there’s a statue of Jefferson Davis on the grounds of the University of Texas, Austin.

Out, thou foul flag… and statue and highway sign and school name! Be gone!Head in Hands 01

What are libs going to do when they want to call Republicans the Confederacy rising again when there is no sign that the Confederacy ever existed?

Will Levon Helm and The Band now go the way of the hated and banished flag for the offense of “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down?” My god, the racism in that song, in his soulful voice, is just so obvious.

Fine. Purge to your heart’s content, Liberals. If you finish with the flags, statues, highways and schools, and you still have a taste for blood, there’s always the graves of Confederate soldiers. There they are under those headstones–maybe they’re not even dead yet. Alinsky affect

You can always shoot ’em again. Of if that’s not enough, dig ’em up. The bones are probably dust, but go ahead–burn the dust. It will make you feel all righteous and superior.

And that’s what this is really all about, isn’t it?

freedom combo 2

Surprising Story: True Courage Not Confined to the Battlefield


http://clashdaily.com/2013/11/surprising-story-true-courage-confined-battlefield/#9ZAslsdlVEWrB2HY.99

By 

General-Robert-e-lee (1)It was a relatively small church. The parishioners knew each other quite well. Or did they?

Families had helped build each other’s houses. Barn raisings had been a common, even social event. Their children had courted each other, some having gone on to marriage. They had stood together and cried together at the gravesides of countless loved ones over the past five years. They had gone through a most traumatic period as a community. Now it was time for the healing to begin.

Together in church one day, they would be challenged, and together, most would fail.

Such is the story of human history, and sadly, of the Body of Christ known to the world as “the Church.” Sometimes, there is but one man who has the courage of his convictions and that sole man’s faithfulness in the heat of battle may melt the hard-hearted and inspire the lesser men around him.

One sunny day in a little Virginian church, parishioners gathered to observe what is known in much of Christendom as The Lord’s Supper – the Eucharist. As the people were about to keep the ritual, a young man – a young, “black man” entered from the back and approached the podium to, himself, partake.

There was a noticeable gasp, an uncomfortable, drawn out silence and even the parson seemed at a loss for this was no mere mistake, this was an outright offense.

Did this man know not of his station in life? What insolence! He had his own place of worship – a “black” assembly, but this was “ours?” Something had to be done!

Just when it seemed that chaos might break out, a distinguished elderly man arose from a middle pew.

Well known and well respected, not just in this little Virginia chapel but also in the whole of the Confederacy, and throughout the entire country, he would set things straight. There seemed to be a collective sigh of relief, the congregation was able to breathe again and some of the men were eager in their anticipation of the coming “fix.”

Approaching the young man – the young, “black man” whose head was now bowed as he kneeled at the altar, the elderly gentleman, to the surprise of those assembled, took his place next to him; next to the black man.

Without saying a word, he slowly kneeled; his age and the cost of war made it slow but deliberate, then looked his parson in the eyes and nodded as if to say, “get on with it.” He then bowed his head again to wait his turn.

It may have shocked some in attendance, though they’d never challenge their hero on it, in public or private. It most certainly shocked the young man who rightly or wrongly decided to interrupt a church service to make a statement.

The parson began the ritual and the young man, (who never really was that young, “black man” but a fellow believer, even a brother in Christ), was able to partake.

Shamefully, not because of the will of the people, or the wisdom of the parson, but because of the courage of one old man what could have turned into a terrible wrong was made right, the wind and the waves rebuked.

As the old man took the wafer, another man rose and slowly made his way to the front, and then another followed by another.

It would have been very easy for the old man to stay in his seat; they were his friends, they were his family and he, their hero. The peer pressure must have been overwhelming, but he did the right thing, he did the hard thing.

A few years prior, on another battlefield, this “old man” faced the pressure of another battle with an overwhelming enemy. Outnumbered nearly three to one, poorly supplied, and facing the annihilation of his army, he had to make another hard choice. Surely the easy thing to do would be to retreat, fight the battle another day or to at least dig in and let someone else take the initiative, but not he. He did the hard thing, what many would call, the impossible thing: he attacked and he won.

Many may know what General Robert E. Lee achieved at Chancellorsville in early May of 1863, but only a few, what he accomplished in that little chapel after the war had ended.

Some say that bravery in the face of the enemy is the highest and most honorable of virtues. Others would argue that it is the courage one must muster in the face of friends, family and peers, when those dearest to you are out of line, that is the epitome of valor.

Hollywood loves the charged ending with a charismatic character in righteous indignation calling down fiery condemnation on those in the wrong – a scorched earth campaign like Tom Cruise inA Few Good Men or Al Pacino in Scent of a Woman. Sadly, in the face of unrepentant sin, this is sometimes necessary. But notice the grace bestowed by the good general: grace to a young black man with an agenda, grace to a hesitant, paralyzed parson, but most of all, to the stilted crowd.

There was no condemnation here, no presumption about their character. The old general simply did the right thing and led by example and he did it in a manner so as to give those in his company an “out” so that they too could join him in victory.

This is noble! This is magnanimous! This is the heart of true, Christian courage!

*To find out more about the inspiring life of Robert E. Lee, read R.E. Lee: A Biography by Douglas Southall Freeman (preferably the 4 volume set).

Image: Courtesy of: http://billingshistory2010.wikispaces.com/Brian_Battlefield_Tactics

About the author: John Kirkwood

John Kirkwood is a son of Issachar. He is a Zionist, gun-toting, cigar-smoking, incandescent light bulb-using, 3.2 gallon flushing, fur-wearing, Chinese (MSG) eating, bow-hunting, SUV driving, unhyphenated American man who loves his wife, isn’t ashamed of his country and does not apologize for his Christianity. He Pastors Grace Gospel Fellowship Bensenville, where “we the people” seek to honor “In God we Trust.” He hosts the Christian wake up call IN THE ARENA every Sunday at noon on AM 1160 and he co-hosts UnCommon Sense, the Christian Worldview with a double shot of espresso on UncommonShow.com. He is the proud homeschooling dad of Konnor, Karter and Payton and the “blessed from heaven above” husband of the Righteous and Rowdy Wendymae.

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