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Posts tagged ‘The Intercept’

Orwellian Bracelet Pushed by Big Tech to Enforce Social Distancing Will Beep to Prevent Human Contact


Reported by   | May 27, 2020

The Intercept has reported on the push to slap FitBit-style bracelets onto people in order to track them and coerce their behavior. AiRISTA Flow, a tech firm based out of Maryland, is marketing bracelets that would beep whenever a person comes within six feet of another individual in the workplace.

“When people come within six feet of each other for a period of time,” the company wrote in a press release about their creepy and invasive device, “the device makes an audible chirp and a record of the contact is made in the AiRISTA Flow software system.”

The technology would also allow employers to track every violation of social distancing edicts committed by their workers. The workers could then be reprimanded, or even fired, based off of the information gathered by the device.

The Redpoint Positioning Corporation is developing similar technology to turn employers into quarantine enforcement brigades. They have announced that they are working on modifying “cutting-edge technology … already used by leading companies worldwide in third-party logistics, auto manufacturing, mine operation” to be used in the enforcement of social distancing edicts. They plan on tagging people and products in the workplace to allow employers to institute Draconian restrictions on the freedom of movement.

“If social distancing parameters, such as a 1- or 2-meter radius, are violated between workers, the tag alarm will alert them to the hazard,” Redpoint wrote in their press release.

“If an infection does occur, historical data from the system will allow for highly accurate contact tracing, as records can show the individuals who were near the infected party,” they added.

Israeli surveillance firm SuperCom is repackaging services that are used on criminals to enforce home confinement on ordinary people in the workplace. They are calling their service “PureCare,” and it is described as a “state-of-the-art solution for quarantine and isolation monitoring to aid government efforts in containing and limiting the reach of infectious diseases.” They claim it is “a non-intrusive patient friendly system that constantly tracks patient location within buildings, vehicles and outside.”

They noted in their press release that they have experienced a sharp increase in “government agencies looking to restrict the spread of COVID-19 among their general population” and anticipate “additional potential industry demand for electronic monitoring services coming from the incarcerated American population.”

SuperCom talks in a cavalier fashion about how their technology will be used to treat ordinary law-abiding citizens like criminals. They released a promotional video on YouTube boasting that the exact same type of technology used to track and control convicts will be used on regular people.

“In the past, we have spent a lot of our time focusing on very accurate and state of the art tracking of offenders,” SuperCom Americas President Ordan Trabelsi said in the video.

“Many customers and potential customers around the world asked us if we could use that same platform to do, you know, Covid-19 home quarantine tracking and compliance. And we thought, of course we can because it’s exactly what we do in the offender tracking space. But now we’ll just be tracking people that are not essentially offenders but unluckily were exposed to the virus,” he added.

Civil liberties advocates and privacy rights advocates are crying foul at the rapid mainstreaming of this invasive technology for the purposes of contact tracing.

“I found the ankle monitor and other tracking methods described [by SuperCom] highly inappropriate and detrimental to a public health response in being unreasonably and unnecessarily coercive,” said Leonard Rubenstein, a bioethicist and human rights attorney with the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, “a serious invasion of privacy without any safeguards, and promoting an adversarial relationship to public health authorities when the relationship should be built on trust.”

President Donald Trump was right to warn that the cure may be worse than the disease. The coronavirus pandemic may usher in a new normal that destroys the concepts of privacy and anonymity forever.

Trump Admin. ARRESTS Leaker, Guess Who it is…


The Justice Department has filed charges against a 25-year-old woman. Reality Leigh Winner has been accused of stealing Top Secret information and providing it to the online news outlet, The Intercept.

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The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court in Georgia. The report states Winner is accused of “removing classified material from a government facility and mailing it to a news outlet.”

Winner lives in Augusta and worked for Pluribus International since Feb. 13. There, she did have Top Secret clearance.

On May 9th, according to the complaint, “Winner printed and improperly removed classified intelligence reporting, which contained classified national defense information from an intelligence community agency, and unlawfully retained it.” She then mailed (yes, mailed, envelope, stamp, the whole nine yards) the information to the online news source a few days later. The documents “appeared to be folded and/or creased, suggesting they had been printed and hand-carried out of a secured space.” 

The agency conducted an internal audit and found only six people had printed the information. One of them was Winner.

“A further audit of the six individuals’ desk computers revealed that WINNER had e-mail contact with the News Outlet. The audit did not reveal that any of the other individuals had e-mail contact with the News Outlet.”

leaker

Not the smartest leaker if you ask us.

Though the news outlet was not named in the complaint, NBC News reported that the recipient of the information was The Intercept, a website founded by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar. 

The U.S. agency that contracts with Pluribus International was also not named, but it is known that the National Security Agency does contract work through the firm.

The content of the stolen documents also leads to the conclusion that it was the NSA. The documents contained Top Secret information about Russia’s attempts to hack into voter registration systems prior to the election.

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FBI agents interviewed Winner at her home on Saturday. During the interview she acknowledged that “she intentionally identified and printed” classified information “despite not having a ‘need to know,’ and with knowledge that the intelligence reporting was classified.”

“Winner further admitted removing the classified intelligence reporting from her office space, retaining it, and mailing it from Augusta, Georgia, to the news outlet, which she knew was not authorized to receive or possess the documents,” the complaint reads.

The U.S. agency notified the FBI of the breach on June 1. The news outlet to which Winner provided the information contacted the agency the day before and said that it was in possession of documents it believed were authored by the agency. The news outlet said that it planned to publish an article based on the documents.

The federal complaint then states that the news outlet published the information on May 5. That appears to be an error. The Intercept published an article based on stolen NSA documents on Monday.

The Daily Caller

She was definitely not the smartest leaker ever and it was pretty easy to find her.

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