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PHOTOS: The Images That Defined the World in 2019


Written by Frances Martel | 

URL of the original posting site: https://www.breitbart.com/asia/2019/12/31/photos-the-images-that-defined-the-world-in-2019/

Venezuela’s National Assembly head Juan Guaido declares himself the country’s “acting president” during a mass opposition rally against leader Nicolas Maduro, on the anniversary of a 1958 uprising that overthrew military dictatorship in Caracas on January 23, 2019. – Moments earlier, the loyalist-dominated Supreme Court ordered a criminal investigation of … FEDERICO PARRA/AFP/Getty Images

The end of the decade brought with it a tumultuous 2019 — a year defined by global protests, shock election results, surprise heroes, unthinkable tragedies, and new rays of hope.

The world’s authoritarians used their wealth to display their typical egomania, popping up in celebrity weddings, on mountaintops, and in larger-than-life iconography (paid for by the people, of course). Oppressed people flooded their streets by the millions demanding a better future. Young new world leaders, often by surprise, assumed the direction of their scarred, turbulent countries.

Below, in no particular order, some of the most moving, iconic, baffling, newsworthy, and generally notable images from around the world in the past year.

AFP

Sitcom star Volodymyr Zelensky celebrates being elected to the presidency of Ukraine on April 21 after playing a schoolteacher who suddenly becomes president of Ukraine in the hit comedy Servant of the People. Zelensky was elected on the back of nationwide discontent with decades of corrupt establishment rule and insufficient resistance to the Russian invasion of Ukraine’s eastern territories. Zelensky has now become a key figure in the Democrats’ attempt to remove President Donald Trump from power without electing a Democrat. (Photo: AFP)

Kiyoshi Ota/Getty, West Point Grey Academy

Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, attends a working lunch on the first day of the G20 summit on June 28, 2019, in Osaka, Japan. Inset: a photo that surfaced in September of Trudeau in “brownface” at an “Arabian Nights” theme party in 2001. The photo surfaced shortly before Canada’s national election but failed to unseat Trudeau, despite the prime minister admitting he had worn blackface so many times he could not remember them all. (Kiyoshi Ota – Pool/Getty Images. Inset: unknown, released via Time)

The Associated Press

French President Emmanuel Macron shakes hands with American President Donald Trump at the G& Summit in August. Macron attempted to organize a meeting with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (Photo via Associated Press)

A Lebanese protester offers sweets to people during ongoing demonstrations to demand better living conditions and the ouster of a cast of politicians who have monopolised power and influence for decades, on October 21, 2019 north of Beirut.(Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images)

AFP

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan serves as best man to soccer star Mesut Ozil at the latter’s wedding in Istanbul. (Photo via AFP)

Venezuela’s National Assembly head Juan Guaido takes the oath of office of the presidency, following the illegal “inauguration” of socialist dictator Nicolás Maduro, on January 23, 2019. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

TOPSHOT - Anti-government protesters start a large fire in a staircase at the main entrance that leads into the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in the Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 18, 2019. - Hong Kong police early November 18 warned for the first time that they may use "live rounds" after pro-democracy protesters fired arrows and threw petrol bombs at officers at a beseiged university campus, as the crisis engulfing the city veered deeper into danger. Protests have tremored through the global financial hub since June, with many in the city of 7.5 million people venting fury at eroding freedoms under Chinese rule. (Photo by Ye Aung Thu / AFP) (Photo by YE AUNG THU/AFP via Getty Images)

The aftermath of police raiding Hong Kong Polytechnic University on November 18, 2019. Hong Kong police early November 18 warned for the first time that they may use “live rounds” after pro-democracy protesters fired arrows and threw petrol bombs at officers at a besieged university campus, as the crisis engulfing the city veered deeper into danger. (Photo by YE AUNG THU/AFP via Getty Images)

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami, chant slogans for ousted former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in Hyderabad, Pakistan. Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president ousted by the military in 2013, collapsed during a trial session in Cairo on Monday and died. (AP Photo/Pervez Masih)

Supporters of the Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami, chant slogans for ousted former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in Hyderabad, Pakistan. Tuesday, June 18, 2019. Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president ousted by the military in 2013, collapsed during a trial session in Cairo on Monday and died. (AP Photo/Pervez Masih)

NEGOMBO, SRI LANKA - APRIL 24: A little girl throws earth on a coffin during the funeral of a person killed in the Easter Sunday attack on St Sebastian's Church, on April 24, 2019 in Negombo, Sri Lanka. At least 321 people were killed and 500 people injured after coordinated attacks on churches and hotels on Easter Sunday in and around Colombo as well as at Batticaloa in Sri Lanka. According to reports, the Islamic State group have claimed responsibility on Tuesday for the attacks while investigations show the attacks were carried out in retaliation for the Christchurch mosque shootings last month. Police have detained 40 suspects so far in connection with the suicide bombs while the government blame the attacks on local Islamist group National Thowheed Jamath (NTJ). (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

A little girl throws earth on a coffin during the funeral of a person killed in the Easter Sunday attack on St Sebastian’s Church, on April 24, 2019, in Negombo, Sri Lanka. At least 321 people were killed and 500 people injured after coordinated attacks on churches and hotels on Easter Sunday in and around Colombo as well as at Batticaloa in Sri Lanka. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

Church members carry placards reading "self defence is now the answer" "the jihad will not work", as they take part in a protest against the killing of people by suspected herdsmen in Makurdi, north-central Nigeria, on April 29, 2018. - On April 24, 2018, at least 18 people, including two Catholic priests, were killed in an attack on a church near the state capital Makurdi that was blamed on herdsmen. Eleven ethnic Hausa traders were killed in Makurdi in retaliation. Thousands of people have been killed over decades in clashes between cattle herders and farmers over land and water, with the conflict polarised along religious and ethnic lines. (Photo by EMMY IBU / AFP) (Photo credit should read EMMY IBU/AFP/Getty Images)

Church members carry placards reading “self-defence is now the answer” “the jihad will not work,” as they take part in a protest against the killing of people by suspected herdsmen in Makurdi, north-central Nigeria, on April 29, 2018. On April 24, 2018, at least 18 people, including two Catholic priests, were killed in an attack on a church near the state capital Makurdi that was blamed on herdsmen. (Emmy Ibu/AFP/Getty Images)

Rodong Sinmun/North Korea

“Kim Jong Un, the great leader of our revolution who opens up the period of a great leap for the development of the revolution, personally left the sacred trace in the revolutionary battle sites in Mt Paektu area, the source of the lifeline of the revolution and inexhaustible patriotism, through knee-high virgin snow.” (Photo, caption via North Korean state newspaper Rodong Sinmun)

The Associated Press

An anti-government protester waves a national flag during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. Iraqi security forces fired live bullets into the air and used tear gas against a few hundred protesters in central Baghdad on Thursday, hours after a curfew was announced in the Iraqi capital on the heels of two days of deadly violence that gripped the country amid anti-government protests that killed several people in two days. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)

People attend a candlelight vigil at Victoria Park in Hong Kong on June 4, 2019, to mark the 30th anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown in Beijing. - The semi-autonomous financial hub has hosted an annual vigil every year since tanks and soldiers smashed into protesters near Beijing's Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989 -- an illustration of the city's unusual freedoms and vibrant political scene. (Photo by Philip FONG / AFP) (Photo credit should read )

People attend a candlelight vigil at Victoria Park in Hong Kong on June 4, 2019, to mark the 30th anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown in Beijing, China. Protests against the Chinese regime would begin shortly after this display and have yet to cease. (Photo via Philip Fong/AFP)

The Associated Press

Police shelter behind a hospital sign, as they guard a hospital in Butembo, Congo, on Saturday, April 20, 2019, after militia members attacked an Ebola treatment center in the city’s Katwa district overnight. Violence has deeply complicated efforts to contain what has become the second-deadliest Ebola virus outbreak in history. (AP Photo/Al-Hadji Kudra Maliro)

Deputy Senate speaker Jeanine Anez, raises the four canonical gospels in the air at the Quemado Palace in La Paz after proclaiming herself the country's new interim president in a session of Congress that failed to reach a quorum, on November 12, 2019. - Bolivia's Evo Morales jetted off to exile in Mexico on Tuesday, leaving behind a country in turmoil after his abrupt resignation as president. The country has been hit by weeks of unrest amid violent protests following Morales' contested re-election. (Photo by Aizar RALDES / AFP) (Photo by AIZAR RALDES/AFP via Getty Images)

Bolivian President Jeanine Áñez raises the four canonical gospels in the air at the Quemado Palace in La Paz becoming interim president following socialist leader Evo Morales abandoning the presidency on November 10 and fleeing to Mexico. (Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump (L), Vice President Mike Pence (2nd L) and First Lady Melania Trump (R) stand with Conan, the military dog that was involved with the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, at the White House in Washington, DC, on November 25, 2019. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump (L), Vice President Mike Pence (2nd L) and First Lady Melania Trump (R) stand with Conan, the military dog that was involved with the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, at the White House in Washington, DC, on November 25, 2019. (Photo via Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images)

BEIJING, CHINA - OCTOBER 01: A giant portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping is carried atop a float at a parade to celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 , at Tiananmen Square on October 1, 2019 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

A giant portrait of Chinese dictator Xi Jinping is carried atop a float at a parade, in front of an electric screen showing another giant portrait of Chinese dictator Xi Jinping, to celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the violent communist takeover of China on October 1, 2019 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Protesters gathered to say thank you to the United States after US President Donald Trump signed legislation supporting the Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters, with new legislation requiring annual reviews of Hong Kong's rights and freedoms. Demonstrations in Hong Kong have stretched into their sixth month as pro-democracy groups won the recent District Council elections, continuing demands for an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word "riot" to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019, in Hong Kong. Protesters gathered to say thank you to the United States after US President Donald Trump signed legislation supporting the Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters, with new legislation requiring annual reviews of Hong Kong’s rights and freedoms. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

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Today’s TWO Politically INCORRECT Cartoons by A.F. Branco


A.F. Branco Cartoon – O Canada

Obama’s pick for Canada’s Prime Minister is a 3-time black-facer, Justin Trudeau, but wins anyway.
Justin Trudeau WinsPolitical cartoon by A.F. Branco.

Canada’s Supreme Court Relegates Religious Beliefs to Second-Tier Status. America, Be Warned


Reported By Emilie Kao and Spencer McCloy | July 3,

2018 at 2:57pm

Canada’s Supreme Court recently ruled 7-2 against Trinity Western University, prioritizing sexual orientation over the free exercise of religion. This ruling should serve as a warning flag to U.S. citizens. Canada was only nine years ahead of the United States in redefining marriage. If the U.S. does not change direction, we could follow in Canada’s footsteps, sacrificing religious liberty for faux-equality and faux-diversity.

Trinity Western University, in Langley, British Columbia, is a Christian university that hoped to establish a Christian law program. The Law Society of British Columbia refused to grant Trinity Western accreditation, claiming that the university’s community covenant agreement discriminates against LGBT students.

The covenant establishes a Christian community that abstains from violence, acknowledges the inherent worth of every person, prohibits cheating, and bans alcohol. The offending clause in this case is Section 4, titled “Healthy Sexuality.” It states: “Further, according to the Bible, sexual intimacy is reserved for marriage between one man and one woman, and within that marriage bond, it is God’s intention that it be enjoyed as a means for marital intimacy and procreation.”

The dispute over the marriage clause resulted in split rulings in Ontario and British Columbia, forcing the case to the Supreme Court, which decided that the law society possesses “an overarching interest in protecting the values of equality and human rights.”

Although the seven judges in the majority admitted that denying Trinity Western an accredited law school because of its covenant violated its religious freedom, the judges reasoned that the school’s religious belief was of “minor significance” and that the covenant “optional” to the school’s ability to fulfill its purpose. The court decided that any student who attended Trinity Western’s proposed law school would be so influenced by the covenant that they would be rendered unfit for legal practice.

The two dissenting judges argued that preventing Trinity Western from forming an accredited law school would undermine true diversity in the public square, contrary to the Law Society of British Columbia’s stated mission. They rightly stated, “The purpose of TWU’s admissions policy is not to exclude LGBTQ persons, or anybody else, but to establish a code of conduct which ensures the vitality of its religious community.”

Instead of recognizing that religious liberty should protect Trinity Western’s right to build a community that reflects its religious beliefs, the Supreme Court relegated religious freedom and religious students to second-tier status.

As Brett Harvey, senior counsel with the Alliance Defending Freedom, notes, the U.S. Constitution and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms are inherently different. Whereas the U.S. Constitution places religious freedom in a pre-eminent position among rights, Canada’s Charter does not secure rights at all. Instead, as Harvey points out, it merely acts as a set of “guidelines” that judges interpret, based on their preferences.

The judges who ruled against Trinity Western did so in the name of “diversity.” In reality, the decision stifles true diversity, creating a counterfeit diversity that attacks differences of thought and religious conviction. In the name of this faux-diversity, Canada has trampled religious freedom and pushed religious believers to the outskirts of the public square unless they conform to the state’s view of sexuality.

All citizens lose when the government restricts the number of choices in the marketplace of ideas. The practical effect of Canada’s so-called “diversity is economic discrimination against those who hold religious convictions that support marriage between one man and one woman.

Students from Christian schools like Trinity Western who are exceptionally qualified for legal practice will be forced to choose between their dreams of practicing law or their religious beliefs. They won’t be allowed to enjoy both.

The Trinity Western case is strikingly similar to recent cases in the U.S. court system. Fortunately, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission allowed Christian baker Jack Phillips to work in his chosen profession without sacrificing his beliefs.  But florists, photographers, videographers, and people who work outside the wedding industry face the same cultural tide that led to the abridgment of Trinity Western’s religious freedom.

Lawyers in the U.S. face a similar threat. Like the Law Society of British Columbia in Canada, the American Bar Association (ABA) is the governing body that accredits law schools and sets ethics standards for practicing lawyers. Like in Canada, the ABA passed Model Rule 8.4(g) in the name of protecting equality and diversity, but it will actually function as a speech code.

As Amy E. Swearer, a legal-policy analyst with the Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at The Heritage Foundation, warned American law students, the rule could become a tool to discipline lawyers who disagree with the ABA’s views on sexuality and the family.

The U.S. Constitution accords a unique status to religious freedom, but the specter of Trinity Western should give all Americans pause. Voters, legislators, and judges should heed the signal from our neighbor to the north that in the wake of marriage redefinition, religious freedom must be robustly protected to ensure that true diversity of thought flourishes in the public square.

Emilie Kao is director of the Richard and Helen DeVos Center for Religion & Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation.

Spencer McCloy is a member of the Young Leaders Program at The Heritage Foundation.

A version of this Op-Ed previously appeared on The Daily Signal website under the headline, “Canada’s Supreme Court Relegates Religious Beliefs to Second-Tier Status. America, Be Warned.”

Hours After Trudeau Complains About Tariffs, Donald Fires Back



disclaimerReported By Cillian Zeal | June 1, 2018 at 11:11am

URL of the original posting site: https://www.westernjournal.com/ct/hours-after-trudeau-complains-about-tough-tariffs-trump-delivers-tough-message-on-twitter/

In a tweet Friday morning, President Donald Trump hit back at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s complaints about American tariffs on steel and aluminum imports to the United States from Canada.

In the tweet, Trump noted Canada’s high levels of protectionism on agriculture and said that trade barriers would come down only if Americans got a fair deal out of our neighbors to the north.

On Thursday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said that the 25 percent tariffs on aluminum and 10 percent tariffs on steel would be placed on Canada, Mexico and the European Union at midnight. While those three entities had been given reprieves when the tariffs were first announced, according to CNBC, the exemptions expired Friday and the administration apparently had not gotten the response it wanted from any of the three.

Trump wrote that he supported Ross’ “finding that steel mill articles are being imported into the United States in such quantities and under such circumstances as to threaten to impair the national security of the United States.”

“The United States has been taken advantage of for many decades on trade,” Trump said Thursday. “Those days are over. Earlier today, this message was conveyed to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada: The United States will agree to a fair deal, or there will be no deal at all.”

In response, Prime Minister Trudeau was the same Trudeau we’ve come to know and … well, let’s just leave it at that.

“We have to believe that at some point, common sense will prevail. But we see no sign of that in this action today by the U.S. administration,” Trudeau said in response.

His country also announced retaliatory tariffs aimed at American aluminum, steel and other products.

So, of course, Trump put Trudeau on blast using his favorite medium.

“Canada has treated our Agricultural business and Farmers very poorly for a very long period of time,” Trump tweeted Friday morning. “Highly restrictive on Trade! They must open their markets and take down their trade barriers! They report a really high surplus on trade with us. Do Timber & Lumber in U.S.?” 

While one questions whether a trade war with Canuckistan is really worth the hit to the American economy, it’s worth noting that Trump isn’t without a point here. While Trudeau and his fellow Canadians may talk a good game on free trade, our neighbors to the north have some serious protectionist issues of its own, particularly in the aforementioned arena of agriculture.

One of the biggest areas of contention in NAFTA negotiations, as noted by Maclean’s earlier this year, is Canada’s protectionist regime to help their dairy, milk and egg producers.

“Supply management is a set of government-imposed production quotas and structured prices to limit domestic supply while impeding consumer access to foreign imports through high tariffs,” they reported. “The outcome is reduced choice and higher prices for consumers, and higher revenues for producers.”

This is mostly to protect a group of just over 13,000 agricultural producers in the country, which also hurts Canada’s poor by dramatically raising the prices on basic food items. The Globe and Mail estimated those tariffs at 247 percent on average in spite of the fact that Canada is a net exporter of food. Compare that with 4.1 percent for Australia, New Zealand and Chile — other net food exporters.

We would have to believe that, at some point, common sense would prevail in Canada.

However, we’ve seen consecutive governments formed by Canada’s two major political parties — Conservative and Liberal — continue on the same path. We see no sign of that in any action by any Canadian administration — and that’s what Trump is calling them out on.please likeand share and leave a comment

Hypocritical Canada Deported “Hundreds” of Illegal Immigrants and Refugees


Reported By Onan Coca | September 12, 2017

Black Lives Matter Leader calls White People “Subhuman” says Black People are the “Superior Race”


waving flagAuthored By Onan Coca February 13, 2017

Yusra Khogali

I’m just not sure anymore how any self-respecting liberal can honestly deny that the BlackLivesMatter movement is racist. The Toronto Sun did some digging and found a short commentary written by Black Lives Matter Toronto co-founder Yusra Khogali back in 2015 on Facebook. Here’s what she said:

Whiteness is not humxness (humanness). In fact, white skin is sub-humxn.

All phenotypes exist within the black family and white ppl are a genetic defect of blackness. White ppl… are genetically deficient because… (She goes on to list various melanin related reasons that whites are genetically inferior.)

Therefore, white ppl are recessive genetic defects. This is factual…

 Yusra Khogali BlackLivesMatter Leader

Much of what she writes in the post is similarly disgusting and just as ridiculous and racist. Just as the white supremacists are evil and hate-filled, so too are the racists of Black Lives Matter. Khogali’s been getting a lot of press recently, just last week during a protest in Toronto she actually called one of her allies, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a “white supremacist terrorist.”

“When Justin Trudeau says that he is a liar! He’s a hypocrite! He is a white supremacist terrorist! That is what he is. Do not be fooled by his liberal bullsh**. Do not be fooled.”Leftist monster race

Also, last year she was caught tweeting prayers for strength not to cuss or kill “men and white folks” who were counter-demonstrating against BlackLivesMatter.

Yusra Khogali tweet

“Plz Allah give me strength to not cuss/kill these men and white folks out here today. Plz plz plz.”

This is the heart of the Black Lives Matter movement folks, they are as hate-filled and evil as the white supremacists of the KKK. The only difference between the two groups is the amount of melanin in the skin of their supporters.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Onan Coca

Onan is the Editor-in-Chief at Liberty Alliance media group. He’s also the managing editor at Eaglerising.com, Constitution.com and the managing partner at iPatriot.com. Onan is a graduate of Liberty University (2003) and earned his M.Ed. at Western Governors University in 2012. Onan lives in Atlanta with his wife and their three wonderful children. You can find his writing all over the web.

Look What Liberals Are Planning to Build for Muslim Refugees With TAXPAYER Money


waving flagWritten by Wes Walker on February 9, 2016

URL of the original posting site: http://clashdaily.com/2016/02/look-what-liberals-are-planning-to-build-for-muslim-refugees-with-taxpayer-money

Socialism alert

Be careful what you ask for. That’s always good advice. But it’s especially relevant with America in the midst of another election cycle. Maybe you missed it, but Canada just offered a harrowing example of what happens when you neglect that life lesson. (Bernie and Hillary voters take note.)

Some background for context: A little more than a year ago, Canada was one of the few voices denouncing Russian meddling in the Ukraine, it held a military commitment to fighting ISIS, and the headline in a British article read “Israel loses ‘best friend’ as Justin Trudeau defeats Stephen Harper.”

About that time, Ottawa made the news when an armed gunman was shot dead in the Parliament Buildings, within the very seat of Canadian Government power. That was before Canadians elected their own version of Obama: the Selfie-taking, magazine-cover posing, Social Justice Warrior, Justin Trudeau.definetly

When it came time for elections, one guy promised fiscal restraint, solid foreign policy, and a cautious acceptance of some refugees in limited numbers. The other guy promised (promised!) to raise debt, to fast-track thousands of refugees and give people free stuff.

Naturally, (with a lot of help from unions) people voted for free stuff. Foreign policy didn’t even enter many people’s thinking. But the “free stuff” was only a bribe to enable an ambitious Social Justice Warrior’s hands to seize political power. Now we’re up to speed. What was the price of the free stuff he promised?

His treatment of the military, for one. Trudeau is pulling military support out of the campaign against ISIS, and at the same time, he is building mosques on military bases. Canada will be using seven military bases to house some 6000 refugees long-term.

(His disdain for the military had already been shown by his infamous slur “…rather than whip out our CF-18s and show them how big they are”.)  Clearly, the hard lessons from Europe’s refugee experiment are lost on Trudeau.

What are the problems here? I mean, besides the idea that the PM is oblivious to any problems.Do you want

Ghetto creation.

By ghetto, I mean, of course, not poverty, but a community-within-a-community, more or less contained in its own little bubble.

In such an environment they will not — cannot — integrate with other Canadians, learn the language, and adapt to local customs. They will be surrounded by their own people, language and customs. This only reinforces their self-exclusion from the rest of the nation, and hampers social integration. Worse still, this isolation and disconnectedness from Canada makes them less resistant to the rhetoric of would-be Islamist recruiters.Islam is NOT

Preferential treatment for Islam. Trudeau campaingned in mosques … a lot … and appointed the troublingOmar Alghabra (a proponent of Sharia Law) as “Parliamentary Secretary to the foreign minister.” So preference isn’t surprising.

We’re building mosques, buying Korans and giving prayer mats. With taxpayer dollars. The mosques are being built on base, on government land. Let’s ask the related question: would we build similar centers, and offer comparable worship materials for other religions? Suppose they were Russian Orthodox and living on base. Would they get buildings and prayer ropes on the government dime, too? Or is this a specifically Muslim privilege. And what happens to the non-muslim refugees?American women respond

Security. That’s the big issue. Trudeau speaks dismissively of hazards. Strange reaction for someone who had an armed gunman invade his workplace only 15 months ago. When I was an Air Force brat and lived on base, we couldn’t enter the base without stopping at a checkpoint. Visitors had to be signed in by someone from the base who knew them and could both vouch and be responsible for them.

But Islamists are actively seeking ways to exploit this refugee crisis, and insert sleeper cells into it. They want to exploit our charity and nievite. (Read: willful blindness.) We are putting our own military — who already have written that famous “blank check” in service of the country while deployed — at risk in their own homes and communities. Worse still, we are exposing their families to the same risk.

muslim-obamaRemember Fort Hood? The Parliament shooter? Men and women in uniform are a preferred target for Islamists. And we already know the cowardly Islamists prefer unarmed and unsuspecting targets. The brave servicemen and women they couldn’t possibly defeat on the field of battle would be juicy targets visiting the local grocery store or relaxing at the park with their family.

Hidden agenda? Ignore all that, voter. Remember the free stuff. Because if Socialists have learned anything about human nature, they’ve learned this: “Largess is the opiate of the masses.”

 

 

America are you really paying attention Picture1 In God We Trust freedom combo 2

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