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Ann Coulter Op-ed: California’s Homelessness Magnates


Commentary by Ann Coulter | Posted: Jun 08, 2022

Read more at https://townhall.com/columnists/anncoulter/2022/06/08/californias-homelessness-magnates—p–n2608452/

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com, and WhatDidYouSay.org.

California's Homelessness Magnates

Well, that didn’t last long. Chesa Boudin, the “progressive” district attorney of San Francisco, was recalled in a landslide election on Tuesday. Evidently, even that city’s progressive voters finally got tired of replacing their car windshields. (On the upside, once out of office, Boudin can keep prosecuting as many criminals as he did while in office.)

Quiz for Republicans:

In a shocking upset, the most liberal city in the nation just voted to recall a pro-criminal D.A.

Q: Should you be dedicating your time to:

— Ukraine

— Tax cuts

— Abortion

— Crime

[Sen. Lindsey Graham frantically waving his hand: UKRAINE!]

Crime is primarily a state and local issue, but there are some things the federal government can do. How about auditing the “homelessness” industry for fraud, graft and corruption? (And the drug rehab industry, while you’re at it.) In the last decade, homeless “advocacy” seems to have displaced Hollywood as the most well-compensated and glamorous industry in California.

Michael Shellenberger’s 2021 book, “San Fransicko: Why Progressives Ruin Cities,” details how progressives are foisting drug-addicted mental patients on an unsuspecting public. The problem is less the homeless — the drug-addicted mental patients you will always have with you — and more the well-healed liberals getting rich off the homelessness racket.

He begins by quoting all manner of homeless “advocates” — i.e., people who make money off of homelessness — such as Dr. Margot Kushel of the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF), who insists that homelessness has NOTHING to do with drugs or mental illness. “We’ve always known,” Kushel said, “that most homelessness is a result, pure and simple, of poverty.”

A lot of valuable information comes from sentences that begin with “we’ve always known.”

Convinced of the truth of this preposterous maxim, San Francisco has been doling out billions of dollars to solve homelessness, by providing the homeless — or as we are now commanded to call them, “our unhoused neighbors” — with shelter, food and massive cash payments.

Also free needles! Because homelessness is just a matter of being poor, as “we’ve always known.”

On the other hand …

In 2004, nearly 5,000 homeless people were offered housing by then-Mayor Gavin Newsom. Only 131 accepted.

And because, as Einstein said, doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results is the definition of excellence — isn’t that the quote? — San Francisco just keeps trying the same thing. Under a different mayor, about 15 years later, 150 vagrants were removed from a homeless encampment and offered free housing. Eight accepted.

But that makes no sense! Homeless advocates assured us our unhoused neighbors are just like you and me, except they can’t afford the rent.

Another possible cause of homelessness is hinted at in a recent Harvard University study of chronically homeless people in Boston who were given permanent housing. After following the group for 14 years, last year the researchers released their results: 86% of their subjects were beset by the “tri-morbidity” of mental illness, substance abuse and medical illness. After 10 years, only 12% were still housed. Forty-five percent died before the completion of the study.

Similarly, in 2019, San Francisco’s health department found that fully half of the city’s homeless population — currently housed or not — are both mentally ill and drug addicts. About 1,600 of the city’s estimated 8,035 homeless “frequently used emergency psychiatric services.”

The pernicious — but profitable! — idea that homelessness is caused by poverty has led the city to lavish unimaginable aid on the “poor.” In straight cash welfare, SF offers $588 a month to the poor — and that doesn’t include $192 in food stamps. Compare that to Los Angeles, where the maximum cash payment to the poor is $221, or New York City, where it’s $183.

That $780 a month in cash and food stamps doesn’t include all the free stuff given to the homeless through cutout agencies, like churches and nonprofits, funded by taxpayer dollars and tax-deductible “charitable” donations.

Tom Wolf, a formerly homeless drug addict, said that, thanks to all of San Francisco’s giveaways, he was able to spend his entire general assistance payment on heroin. Which San Francisco also helps out with, giving away 6 million free needles to drug addicts every year. That’s more than New York City dispenses — with a population 10 times larger.

As a result, drug overdose is the leading cause of death among the homeless in San Francisco.

The mother of a drug-addicted, homeless young man told Shellenberger that he describes San Francisco as “Pleasure Island” in the movie “Pinocchio”:

“On one side of the street are people giving you food and clean needles. On the other side of the street are all the drug dealers. It’s like getting all the candy and treats that you think you want. You think you’re having fun. But little by little it’s taking away your humanity and turning you into something you were never meant to be, like how the kids start turning into donkeys in ‘Pinocchio,’ and then end up trapped and in cages.”

What kind of sick society would do this to people?

One possible answer: a society that rewards money-grubbing narcissists with no concern for their fellow man, masquerading as giants of compassion. There’s a ton of money to be made in the helping-the-homeless business. As the formerly homeless Wolf told Shellenberger, “[The homeless nonprofits’] whole intention is to keep more people in this cycle because they’re getting money for it.”

Say, whatever happened with UCSF’s Kushel — of the “we’ve always known” metric? In 2019, she was the lucky recipient of a $30 million grant from San Francisco billionaire Marc Benioff (Salesforce founder) to study homelessness.

Gosh, they’re virtuous.

Ann Coulter Op-ed: California’s Homelessness Magnates


Commentary by Ann Coulter | Posted: Jun 08, 2022

Read more at https://townhall.com/columnists/anncoulter/2022/06/08/californias-homelessness-magnates—p–n2608452/

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com, and WhatDidYousay.org.

California's Homelessness Magnates

Well, that didn’t last long. Chesa Boudin, the “progressive” district attorney of San Francisco, was recalled in a landslide election on Tuesday. Evidently, even that city’s progressive voters finally got tired of replacing their car windshields. (On the upside, once out of office, Boudin can keep prosecuting as many criminals as he did while in office.)

Quiz for Republicans:

In a shocking upset, the most liberal city in the nation just voted to recall a pro-criminal D.A.

Q: Should you be dedicating your time to:

— Ukraine

— Tax cuts

— Abortion

— Crime

[Sen. Lindsey Graham frantically waving his hand: UKRAINE!]

Crime is primarily a state and local issue, but there are some things the federal government can do. How about auditing the “homelessness” industry for fraud, graft and corruption? (And the drug rehab industry, while you’re at it.) In the last decade, homeless “advocacy” seems to have displaced Hollywood as the most well-compensated and glamorous industry in California.

Michael Shellenberger’s 2021 book, “San Fransicko: Why Progressives Ruin Cities,” details how progressives are foisting drug-addicted mental patients on an unsuspecting public. The problem is less the homeless — the drug-addicted mental patients you will always have with you — and more the well-healed liberals getting rich off the homelessness racket.

He begins by quoting all manner of homeless “advocates” — i.e., people who make money off of homelessness — such as Dr. Margot Kushel of the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF), who insists that homelessness has NOTHING to do with drugs or mental illness. “We’ve always known,” Kushel said, “that most homelessness is a result, pure and simple, of poverty.”

A lot of valuable information comes from sentences that begin with “we’ve always known.”

Convinced of the truth of this preposterous maxim, San Francisco has been doling out billions of dollars to solve homelessness, by providing the homeless — or as we are now commanded to call them, “our unhoused neighbors” — with shelter, food and massive cash payments.

Also free needles! Because homelessness is just a matter of being poor, as “we’ve always known.”

On the other hand …

In 2004, nearly 5,000 homeless people were offered housing by then-Mayor Gavin Newsom. Only 131 accepted.

And because, as Einstein said, doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results is the definition of excellence — isn’t that the quote? — San Francisco just keeps trying the same thing. Under a different mayor, about 15 years later, 150 vagrants were removed from a homeless encampment and offered free housing. Eight accepted.

But that makes no sense! Homeless advocates assured us our unhoused neighbors are just like you and me, except they can’t afford the rent.

Another possible cause of homelessness is hinted at in a recent Harvard University study of chronically homeless people in Boston who were given permanent housing. After following the group for 14 years, last year the researchers released their results: 86% of their subjects were beset by the “trimorbidity” of mental illness, substance abuse and medical illness. After 10 years, only 12% were still housed. Forty-five percent died before the completion of the study.

Similarly, in 2019, San Francisco’s health department found that fully half of the city’s homeless population — currently housed or not — are both mentally ill and drug addicts. About 1,600 of the city’s estimated 8,035 homeless “frequently used emergency psychiatric services.”

The pernicious — but profitable! — idea that homelessness is caused by poverty has led the city to lavish unimaginable aid on the “poor.” In straight cash welfare, SF offers $588 a month to the poor — and that doesn’t include $192 in food stamps. Compare that to Los Angeles, where the maximum cash payment to the poor is $221, or New York City, where it’s $183.

That $780 a month in cash and food stamps doesn’t include all the free stuff given to the homeless through cutout agencies, like churches and nonprofits, funded by taxpayer dollars and tax-deductible “charitable” donations.

Tom Wolf, a formerly homeless drug addict, said that, thanks to all of San Francisco’s giveaways, he was able to spend his entire general assistance payment on heroin. Which San Francisco also helps out with, giving away 6 million free needles to drug addicts every year. That’s more than New York City dispenses — with a population 10 times larger.

The mother of a drug-addicted, homeless young man told Shellenberger that he describes San Francisco as “Pleasure Island” in the movie “Pinocchio”:

“On one side of the street are people giving you food and clean needles. On the other side of the street are all the drug dealers. It’s like getting all the candy and treats that you think you want. You think you’re having fun. But little by little it’s taking away your humanity and turning you into something you were never meant to be, like how the kids start turning into donkeys in ‘Pinocchio,’ and then end up trapped and in cages.”

What kind of sick society would do this to people?

One possible answer: a society that rewards money-grubbing narcissists with no concern for their fellow man, masquerading as giants of compassion. There’s a ton of money to be made in the helping-the-homeless business. As the formerly homeless Wolf told Shellenberger, “[The homeless nonprofits’] whole intention is to keep more people in this cycle because they’re getting money for it.”

Say, whatever happened with UCSF’s Kushel — of the “we’ve always known” metric? In 2019, she was the lucky recipient of a $30 million grant from San Francisco billionaire Marc Benioff (Salesforce founder) to study homelessness.

Gosh, they’re virtuous.

Faced With the Horrific Results of Their Ideas, Leftists Are Backpedaling with All Their Might


REPORTED BY: CASEY CHALK | MARCH 04, 2022

Read more at https://thefederalist.com/2022/03/04/faced-with-the-horrific-results-of-their-ideas-leftists-are-backpedaling-with-all-their-might/

homeless

It would appear that leftists don’t actually like a lot of the radical policies they have been advocating for since the beginning of the lockdowns and the death of George Floyd in spring 2020. From homelessness to crime to Covid policies, the left is backtracking on much of its platform in the face of disastrous results and frustration from rank-and-file liberals. Recent developments in our nation’s capital provide some of the most dramatic examples. 

Cities across the country are taking a more aggressive stance on homeless encampments in response to residents’ complaints, including Washington, D.C. An early February poll conducted by The Washington Post found that three-fourths of Washingtonians support the district’s plan to clear the camps of homeless persons that now proliferate across the city.

That the American Civil Liberties Union and even some D.C. council members oppose Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s cleanups have not stopped their enforcement. Bowser has quite a mandate for this: the number of city residents who want these camps cleared does not substantially change based on respondents’ race, and is above 70 percent for white, black, Hispanic, and Asian residents.

That the district is pursuing this policy with substantial local support is a bit ironic, given that so many prominent leftist organizationslocal leftist leaders, and Democratic politicians have been trying for more than a year to protect these encampments. This included Ann Marie Staudenmaier, wife of Maryland gubernatorial candidate Tom Perez, who last year advocated for homeless camps in the district to be permitted and protected. “Don’t evict them from the only place that they have to call home,” she urged.

Perhaps it has something to do with how large numbers of homeless persons affect the cleanliness, security, and attraction of neighborhoods. A separate recent WaPo article cited residents who noted homeless persons in the camp have harassed them. One D.C. resident said downtown is “not pleasant” and that the ubiquity of the encampments threatens the security of local residents.

Although many on the left would likely grimace to say it, national trends on curbing these camps indicate a significant percentage of the rest of America feels the same way.

Refunding the Police

Mayors of America’s largest cities, once responsive to calls to defund the police, have done a dramatic reversal in response to local frustration with higher crime rates. Now “refund the police” has become the cry of many liberal residents.

In D.C., residents’ opinions on crime and police have experienced this shift, given increased crime and murder rates in the city since 2020. According to a recent WaPo poll, a sizable majority (59 percent) now agree that increasing the number of police officers patrolling communities would reduce the amount of violent crime in D.C.

“The share of Washingtonians who say they are not safe from crime has risen to 30 percent this year from 22 percent in November 2019 and is the highest in more than two decades of Post polls,” reports the WaPo.

This is quite a change from the “defund the police” initiatives city residents — and various activist groups — so loudly endorsed after the death of George Floyd. The D.C. government in 2020 supported measures in June 2022 to cut $15 million from the police department budget. At the time, the police chief warned this could lead to the loss of hundreds of officers and that underfunding training and equipment might result in officers using more excessive force.

Thankfully, D.C. is not alone in wanting to refund the police. As NBC reported in February, Democratic politicians are calling the “defund the police” movement “dead” and mayors in San Francisco, New York, and Chicago are “moving to increase police budgets and end ‘the reign of criminals.’”

Surrendering to Pandemic Fatigue

Democratic states are also ending many Covid restrictions in the face of rising complaints from their constituents. Consider D.C. Mayor Bowser’s mid-February announcement that she would lift the city’s vaccine requirement for businesses and “dial back” the city’s indoor mask rules. This announcement followed a number of states — including many governed by Democrats — that have also eased their restrictions as polls come back showing their rising unpopularity. Now D.C.’s party scene is “returning to normal,” reports the WaPo, even though coronavirus case counts in and around Washington remain “high.”

This is a remarkable and speedy shift, especially considering D.C. had some of the most strict Covid restrictions in the country. Perhaps the District’s dramatic about-face has something to do with widespread annoyance with pandemic restrictions, even among liberal voters. Perhaps it results from the rising tide of Democratic politicians listening to their constituencies despite “public health guidance” claiming the country is moving too fast in loosening the rules. 

Perhaps all of these changes also relate to the fact that the District of Columbia is no longer experiencing the population boom and gentrification that have defined the last couple of decades. The capital’s population declined by 2.9 percent from 2020 to 2021, according to the Census Bureau. Living in an increasingly dangerous, filthy nanny-city is apparently not that appealing, even to the District’s majority leftist population. This has been part of a broader national trend as people across the nation in 2021 left Democratic-run states.

Mugged by Reality

To borrow a phrase from the late Irving Kristol, D.C. residents (and liberals across the country) have been mugged by reality — and in some cases actually mugged. Perhaps living in a lefty utopia where the homeless camp wherever they like, undisturbed by a defunded police force, with fickle and irrational health-related restrictions isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be.

Democrat D.C. residents, like the rest of Americans, don’t actually like their public spaces overrun by homeless persons, their neighborhoods suffering increased violent crime rates, or their cities stuck in a cycle of never-ending draconian public safety regulations.

What this all means is that, thankfully, certain activist narratives that threatened all Americans have lost considerable steam. It also means these policies are likely political liabilities in upcoming elections. Perhaps it also shows there are certain things that all Americans can still agree on.


Casey Chalk is a senior contributor at The Federalist and an editor and columnist at The New Oxford Review. He has a bachelor’s in history and master’s in teaching from the University of Virginia and a master’s in theology from Christendom College. He is the author of The Persecuted: True Stories of Courageous Christians Living Their Faith in Muslim Lands.

VIDEO: California’s Coronavirus Problem No One Is Talking About


Reported By  Phelim McAleer | DailyWire.com

URL of the originating web site: https://www.dailywire.com/news/video-californias-coronavirus-problem-no-one-is-talking-about

Homeless people in Los Angles’ “Skid Row.” / Courtesy The Ann and Phelim Scoop

By Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has been on the “cutting edge” of local leaders who have implemented strict shutdowns in the name of fighting the coronavirus and protecting the public. Politicians like Garcetti claim that they must coerce residents to remain in their homes for weeks, or months, on end in order to ease the burden on hospitals and healthcare workers.

But is it worth it when Garcetti is refusing to “lockdown” one of the most at risk populations in Los Angeles? While millions of Los Angeles residents shelter in place, the city’s nearly 36,000 homeless residents continue to wander the streets and go about their business.

Just a few days ago I took a drive down to Skid Row in Los Angeles, where nearly 50% of the area’s inhabitants are homeless — living in tents or on the street. Whereas the rest of Los Angeles is a ghost town, Skid Row looks like it’s any other normal day.

I was shocked to see that the city had not enforced any of their social distancing laws in the neighborhood. Tents were packed tightly together. Thousands of homeless individuals were drinking, socializing, and doing drugs on the sidewalk and in crowded parks. It looked as if the city was on lockdown … except for Skid Row.

Just last week, police officers in Malibu arrested a paddle boarder for violating the county’s ordinances that closed the beaches. It appears that in Los Angeles only taxpayers are on lockdown.

As irritating as it is to a taxpayer, the failure to enforce the law against the homeless is also a massive public health crisis. If there are so few ventilators as our politicians claim, the spread of COVID-19 in the homeless community would be a public health disaster for the city and the state. In fact, the state of California has over 150,000 people who are “experiencing homelessness,” according to the federal government.

You might be thinking, “I’m not homeless. I don’t interact with homeless people. This doesn’t matter to me.” But it does. In fact, a spread of COVID-19 within California’s homeless community could occupy thousands of ventilators. Homeless individuals in California are one of the most at-risk communities to contract serious complications with COVID-19.

According to the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council, homeless individuals have rates of underlying conditionsat nearly twice the rate of housed individuals in the United States. Diabetes, heart attacks, HIV, and pulmonary complications are all afflictions that greatly impact the homeless community and are disastrous when combined with COVID-19.

According to California Governor Gavin Newsom, over 60,000 homeless individuals in California could contractCOVID-19. Newsom also said California has access to only 4,252 ventilators. If the virus is truly as dangerous as our politicians have led us to believe, the math doesn’t add up and California could be in a very precarious position soon.

So when will Los Angeles act? Is it worth shutting down the city’s economy without making a concerted effort to move all homeless individuals off the streets?

Perhaps the city should focus their efforts on stopping a real major public health disaster from crippling our city instead of arresting paddle boarders and beachgoers.

Today’s TWO Politically INCORRECT Cartoons from A.F. Branco


A.F. Branco Cartoon – It’s Never Iran

Iran is at the root of almost all trouble in the Middle East. Saudi Arabia refinery explosions, and Issues in Syria, Afghanistan, Yamen, Iraq, etc.
Iran, the Evil in the Middle EastPolitical cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

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